Boston Marathon 2017: All in a Day’s Work

by Jeff Hall, American Red Cross of Massachusetts

With the 121st running of the Bostonrco_blog_img_marathon2 Marathon in the books, we can pause for a moment and reflect on our success. Our charity running team “Team Red Cross” reached a momentous fundraising goal, collectively raising more than $530,000. A veritable squadron of medically trained volunteers treated more than 1,000 runners. The Red Cross disaster team staffed a number of governmental Emergency Operations Centers and “course disruption centers” to prepare for an unforeseen emergency. And while all of these volunteer efforts were on display, a house fire in Boston required the deployment of a Red Cross “Disaster Action Team” to assist a displaced family.

This enormous accomplishment for the 2017 Boston Marathon began last year, just a few months after the 2016 race. Our two volunteer leads, Stephanie Walsh and Paul Kastner, analyzed the positive and negative aspects of last year’s efforts, and charted the course for 2017.

The Boston Athletic Association, the organization that stages the Marathon, modifies the requirements slightly every year. It was then up to Stephanie and Paul to adjust our plans and training requirements for each of the nearly 500 medical tent volunteers.

In September 2016, the minimum fundraising goal for each Team Red Cross member was increased to $6,500 from $5,000. With this goal, the hundreds of applicants to the Team Red Cross charity team were then whittled down to the 60 bibs given to the Red Cross by the BAA. Some runners had posted qualifying times and were independently accepted in the 2017 race, but decided to run on the Red Cross charity team to raise money to help those in need here in Massachusetts.

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On the day of the Marathon, volunteers and runners gathered to receive their final words of motivation from Red Crossers before the race. Team Read Cross, now totaling 63 runners, made their way from downtown Boston to Hopkinton for the start of the Marathon.

Meanwhile in Wellesley, medical tent volunteers and support staff gathered at Babson College for breakfast, final preparations, their documentation kits and the much-coveted BAA-branded jacket. The medical stations supply basics such as petroleum jelly for chaffing, up to intravenous fluids for runners in more serious conditions. The medical stations act as mini-emergency rooms, where volunteers who work as EMTs or nurses during regular hours treat injuries and illnesses while sending the more urgent cases to area hospitals. With little shade and temperatures in the low 70s, medical tent volunteers were kept busy this year treating some of the 30,000 runners.

Once the race started, at around 9:30 a.m., medical volunteers started to see their first customers as wave after wave of runners left Hopkinton.

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Most of Team Red Cross began in Hopkinton in Wave 4, at about 11:30 a.m. The 63 runners made their way past Heartbreak Hill and into Boston’s Copley Square, where thousands of spectators greeted them. The American Red Cross partnered with Webster Bank this year to host runners and their families during and after the race. One by one, runners made their way into the Boylston Street Webster Bank location, the Team Red Cross Headquarters, to the sounds of cheers and congratulations from family and friends.

Although our medical volunteers would enjoy a Marathon where no runners require their assistance, they were called upon by numerous runners, some suffering from heat exhaustion, some from hypothermia. Over the course of nearly 12 hours, medical volunteers assisted more than 1,000 runners.

Many thanks out to all our volunteers and runners who gave of themselves to help make the 2017 Boston Marathon a tremendous success for the American Red Cross. For the corps of volunteers committed to the work of that American Red Cross of Massachusetts, it was all in a day’s work.

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